Driving Change. aka “When I Drove A Tesla MODEL X!”

Billed as the

“safest, fastest and most capable sport utility vehicle in history”

– you likely already know about Tesla’s MODEL X.

But have you actually driven one?

I have. And it was a game-changer!


Now, I wish I could say I am the proud owner, but it’s my sister’s husband who holds that distinction. Tony ordered one of the touch-screen paneled, falcon-winged doored, electric vehicles three years ago and it recently arrived to their Ohio home.

So! Last month visiting my family in the US, my gracious brother-in-law invited me to give the luxury car a test drive and of course I said,”Yes!”

I’m honestly not one to pay attention to the kind of car a person drives. I usually don’t remember if it was a black Jeep or a dark blue Ford that you picked me up in. I care more about the person inside than the metal transporting us.

But my Tesla experience was transformative.

From the outside, it didn’t grab me. While the wrap-around windshield might say, “modern,” my first glance at Tony’s white Model X exterior didn’t really make me do a double take. And even though the self-opening falcon doors are “Back to the Future” awesome, I was really blown away once I was inside the cock-pit, I mean, behind the wheel.

The large computer screen dash-board is comprehensive. The autopilot feature – keep your hands on the wheel! – was very user friendly.

And the acceleration mode: “Ludicrous” – which tilts you from 0-60 in under 3 seconds is well, you know!

I felt my stomach lurch. Not quite the Ludicrous Speed effect it had on Rick Moranis in Space Balls, but pretty darn close!

Speaking of ludicrous, Tesla founder and self-made billionaire Elon Musk has been described by observers as an “Inventor,” “Engineer,” “Explorer – and “Eccentric.” Business Insider lists a string of Musk quotes is says are either “Crazy or brilliant or in some cases both.”

However you describe him, there’s no mistaking that Musk’s Teslas are accelerating the way the auto industry considers electric mobility.

With more than 125,000 of the Tesla Model S sold since mid-2012, there’s high demand for the more expensive Model X released in November last year. The success has prompted the competition to step up. BMW is now expected to soon introduce its own all-electric version.

So remember that if you’re out there pursuing some dream at the moment that your colleagues or family are perhaps criticizing.  It may seem ludicrous to others, but worthwhile to you.

I’m not here pretending that every and all ideas are positive, productive or even really worth pursuing. There are plenty of them that really are just crazy – not brilliant. Sorry.

But I am saying that sometimes being persistent against all the naysayers and odds may be, like a Tesla, what drives change in your organization, your industry, your world.

Not so ludicrous at all.

Here’s to driving change. And for me to save up for my first Tesla.




I’m so grateful you are reading my essays. I train, consult and speak about leadership, better communications, business and life empowerment. Please click ‘Follow’ (at the top of the page) and reach out to me directly to support you or your organization via LinkedIn, TwitterFacebook and at GinaLondon.com


We can be better.

A fellow human being on this planet just wrote this to me on Linked In:

 I saw you speak at the UCC Commerce Conference and was blown away by your speech – you’re so inspirational! Hope you’re keeping well 🙂

The message came at a time when I – and perhaps many of you – need a reminder about the importance of inspiring others.

It’s this time in the wake of the deadly rampage in Orlando – which just happens to be where I started my career as a journalist working for the Orlando Sentinel.  A town I associated with happy memories now forever tainted with the statistic as the deadliest shooting in the US.

That horror was shortly followed by the senseless killing of a young Member of Britain’s Parliament. In the middle of the afternoon. In front of a library.

The victims in Orlando had been inspirations for their friends and family.  MP Jo Cox was an inspiration too.

As Britain votes Thursday on Brexit, and my home country of the United States prepares to vote for a new president, I implore us all to remember that this is a time to not give up.  We must go on and be inspirations.

Candlelight vigil at Lake Eola in Orlando

Yes, there are plenty of people who are cynical or angry or divisive or even hateful.  Some analysts say the global geopolitical landscape is turning more toward  nationalism, more toward nativism.  We can still stave off this turn.

We, as humans who share a planet, are better when we are positive.  When we are uplifting. Encouraging. When we are appeal to our better instincts – which are, in fact, not instincts after all, but traits that we can develop and deploy – if we set our minds to it.

No matter if we’re in the public sector or the private sector. If we work in local or national government.  For an SME or a major multi-national.  A for-profit or a not-for-profit. If we interact with other people, let us try to focus on how we can encourage one another – not tear each other down – in order to get ahead.

We can deliberately decide that we won’t get personal when we disagree with someone else on a policy or about a work project or about a whatever.

It’s time to get serious about being kind.  It’s about deliberately deciding that “we” is better than “me,” that being considerate is not the same as being weak. That caring for someone who may come from a different background than us, who may look different than us, who may even have a different culture than us – is okay.

I have lived or worked in dozens of countries. From Italy to Indonesia. Egypt to Nigeria. France to Romania. Cambodia to Ireland. I have friends from every place I have been. We continue to inspire each other.

As a fellow Member of Parliament, Rachel Reeves, said yesterday in tribute to Jo Cox, “What we have in common is greater than what divides us.”

We can carry on the work of those who stood for togetherness. For walking forward. Hand in hand.

I am convinced that we can be better.

Copyright 2016 Gina London. All Rights Reserved. 

I’m so grateful you are reading my essays. I train, consult and speak about leadership, better communications, business and life empowerment. Please click ‘Follow’ (at the top of the page) and reach out to me directly to support you or your organization via LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and at GinaLondon.com


Lifting the Uplifters!

I was fortunate to work with the HR department of one of the world’s largest beverage companies this past week.

They were preparing to launch an employee recognition program that is AMAZING!

Simply put, each employee- from top to bottom – will receive 100 points every six months that are redeemable for vouchers like movies, shopping, travel, sky-diving, etc.

That’s not so amazing, you may be thinking.  Lots of places do that.  That’s just a rewards card.  BUT!  In this program, you don’t get to redeem your own points. You award them to a peer whom you see doing something that personifies the company BRAND.


It’s Cool.  It’s “Pay It Forward” codified by a company.

Unfortunately, due to proprietary reasons, I can’t give you the details. Yet.  As soon as this pilot program is successfully ticking along, I plan to absolutely seek a thumbs up from them to tell you – and anybody else who will listen – about this great motivating idea!

What I can tell you is that although this new program was the result of years of internal surveys and had already been socialized in smaller groups, my HR team knew how incredibly pivotal their presentations would be on the official day of the launch.  They wanted to leave nothing to chance.

They know we’re all a bit skeptical of change.  Especially something that feels “too good to be true” like this program almost does.

Therefore, it was imperative that this plan was announced with a great amount of passion, conviction and genuine connection to the employees in their audiences.

We spent a great deal of time discussing the mindset and backgrounds of the audiences, refining the goals and intent the team had for how their presentation should be received, and of course, an equally great deal of time rehearsing and coaching around the content and delivery of the presentation.

Here, then, is the email I received soon after our session, for which I am grateful:

Many thanks for the session on Monday – I really enjoyed it and just wished that we had longer with you!

 We did a full rehearsal yesterday and it was amazing how different our delivery was after our time with you. I’m feeling more relaxed about tomorrow than I expected to after you gave my confidence a lift.  So thank you!”

It was a pleasure and an honor to work with people who are truly committed to innovating ways to inspire and motivate others.

And for you out there:  Where are you on this spectrum? Are you a naysayer? An innovator? An encourager? Or perhaps even a “Lifter of the uplifter?”

Thanks for the opportunity, folks.  Because even the uplifters need a boost now and again. Maybe especially.  Here’s to them.



Copyright 2016 Gina London. All Rights Reserved. 

Renew Your Hope for the New Year

As I was leaving the cafe here in almost always dampy-misty-drizzly Ireland, I first held open the door for an elderly lady.


She smiled up at me as she walked into the dreary outside and said, “Here’s hoping the rain stops soon and we get a burst of precious sunshine.”

I smiled back at her and nodded.  But inside my head was surprised. I thought a bit cynically, “Man, that lady must’ve been around for at least seventy years. She should be used to this perpetually grey weather…

…how funny she’s still making comments about hoping for sun.”

The lady at the café is like most of my Irish friends and acquaintances. They who keep, as they will tell you, “getting on with it.”  They who continue to take care of business, their families and their lives. One eye turned upward in hope of a glimpse of precious sun.

I am certain we have all had our share of emotional rain.  This year, in particular, with so many deadly shootings and terrorist attacks across the globe, it’s not overstating it to bemoan that we have endured more than our share.

And yet, there’s still hope.

Just a couple of days ago, as it began to roll out its holiday “year-ender” pieces,The New York Times took a moment to reflect on some of the brighter moments in 2015 in an expression of hope for sanguine things yet to come.  

So no. The lady’s sentiment was not funny at all.  After I considered that encounter a little longer, I realize hers is only way to be. Unceasingly hopeful.

Simple hope is not enough, of course.  We also have to take positive steps toward realizing the benefits that the vision of hope plants within us.

What are you hoping for? Great. Now in 2016, what are you going TO DO about it?  What active steps? Incremental successes toward a defined goal.  Now is the time to begin.  To achieve what you hope for.

No matter how much rain, we must remain hopeful that the sun is around the bend.

You know the saying,

You can’t have a rainbow without first some rain.

It seems especially true to me leaving here in Ireland.  The land of rain.  The land of rainbows.

Here’s to a 2016 full of hope and positive action!

Copyright 2015 Gina London.  All Rights Reserved. 

What sets you off? And! What can you do about it?!


Are you actively aware of the environmental happenings around you that prompt you to become internally frustrated or worse, to outwardly act out?  “Triggers” is how author Marshall Goldsmith describes them in his recent book of the same name.

Whatever you call them, they are those moments that bring out the worst in you.  The more you understand what causes them, the more you can begin to self-talk your way into preparing a better reaction to help you calm down and not over react.

One of my triggers is when I encounter a “no-can-do person.”  You know them.  Those people that robotically cite a nonsensical policy or refuse to exert a tad bit more energy finding a solution to a small problem. Yes, it’s the small things that sometimes get us the most, isn’t it?

Take the true time I was at a small café in Romania, (I am not blaming the whole country for this incident, of course, merely setting the scene).  The café’s window advertised a “soup and sandwich” special.

“I’ll take the special, please,” I said.

“No, it’s not possible,” the waiter flatly replied. “We’re out of the soup.”

Hungry and eager to get anything, I suggested, “Okay, then I’ll just take a sandwich.”

“As I said, that is not possible. We’re out of soup,” was the incredible retort.

“But can’t you just make me a sandwich on its own?” I prompted (starting to feel that trigger blood pressure rise).

“No. We cannot make sandwiches until we first make more soup to go with it,” was the honest-to-trigger-happy final response I received.  I say final, because immediately after that I turned on my heels and left.

The café chose to let a potential customer leave, rather than make a sale.

Here in Nigeria, where I am spending the week touring the country leading training sessions on Leadership and Communications, I encountered a similar “no-can-do” person at the Port Harcourt airport.

Last year in Port Harcourt - looked a lot like this year - except for one thing!
Last year in Port Harcourt – looked a lot like this year – except for one thing!

We had just snapped a photo of our team upon arrival when a non-smiling young man approached us.

“You cannot take photos here. Delete that,” he said.

“Why not?” I asked, trying to engage him.  “We took them right here last year.”

“But can you please tell me the reason?” I pressed. “Is there a manager I could speak to?”

A nearby older man came over and completely agreed with the younger man.

“Delete that and I need to watch you.”

I was about to persist, when from my right came a voice of reason.

Gina, let it go. It’s not worth it. Remember our mission.”

My co-trainer, colleague, and friend  – better known as the acclaimed Nigerian executive, leadership coach and keynote speaker that he is, Richmond Dayo Johnson – reminded me of what was important.

Don’t try to reason with the unreasonable.  Get on with the important things in your life. For me, having that photo was not one.

So, now, I am happily posting our team photo from Port Harcourt from last year! And I am also thanking, RDJ, and Marshall Goldsmith and others who remind us to remember to stay focused on the important things and not get distracted by the chaos around us.

Just another day in Naija
Just another day in Naija

Life can be chaotic.  As I look outside my window on the Nigerian street scene passing by, I see Hawkers squeezing between the jammed traffic, trying to sell figs or biscuit or bottles of water. I see crowded market stalls teeming with people.  It’s a bit chaotic, but believe it or not, it is largely calm.

People are going about their day.

In the past year, our team coordinators, Omon and Ibukun, have each been robbed in their cars; Omon was robbed by gunpoint.  And yet, they go on.  They are here. Committed to helping us bring leadership and communications training to hundreds of college leaders around their country.

How dare I get deterred by an unjustly deleted photo?

But you know it happens to you too, doesn’t it? The car that cuts you off when you’ve politely signalled your intention to change lanes.  The clerk at the DMV who turns you away for whatever miniscule reason without any emotion at all.  The work associate who has still not read your email.

We all have our triggers.  But, honestly, unless you’re a Syrian refugee, battling a life-threatening illness, or grappling with a small handful of extreme life-impacting events, you’re probably doing okay.

  1. Catalog your triggers.  
  2. Take note and consider alternative ways to react. 
  3. And count your blessings it’s not worse.

Always learning and growing! Here’s to making it a great week.

Greetings from Nigeria,

At Saturday's Port Harcourt Training session - where cameras WERE allowed.
At Saturday’s Port Harcourt Training session – where cameras WERE allowed.



Copyright 2015 Gina London. All Rights Reserved. 

How to Power UP your bio!

If you don’t have a powerful bio, it’s time you do.

Power up!
Power up!

Yesterday, one of my executive clients was a bit overwhelmed upon reading the new “powered-up” bio I had drafted for him.

“It’s the first time someone has written about me like that,” he said.  “I don’t know if I’m ready to view myself that way.”

But after serving nearly 20-years as a professional educator, my client had acquired more than simple experience.

He had demonstrated real strategic success – by launching new curriculum programs which other institutions modelled, by being appointed to top leadership on school boards, by guiding national conferences which expand impact with each year.

So, among other the descriptors I deployed in his new bio, is the word “expert.”  It’s a word not to be taken lightly, but it is a powerful word that you may consider using too.

Take a quick read of your current bio.  How does it read? Is it a boring list of places you worked? Or is there a real story of your accomplishments using active and colourful verbs and descriptions.  Have a friend read your bio and get their opinions, too.

If you have a Linked In or Twitter profile you already have a micro-bio.   How do they reflect upon your professional brand?  Now, aim for two more:  one at about 100 words and then another that’s a one-pager.  Ready?

Here are my quick tips:

  1. Grab the audience right away. Think of this as the “lede” in a news story.  What is your professional point of distinction?  Make this sentence sing and your reader will be inclined to read further. Make this sentence the boring same-old-same old, and your reader will drift off mentally if not physically.
  2. Use Superlatives.  What are you great at? Then tell us. Words like “premier” “best” “recognized” or “number 1” may seem over the top to you at first, but they do get attention.  Yes, I know we’re taught not to brag, but if you’re not lying, your bio is the time to show pride!
  3. Tell a short story to illustrate an achievement. If you’re listing that you’re on the board of an organization, try to add a quick sentence or two in your longer bio that describes something innovative or extra cool that you did while in that role.
  4. Add some fun. Did you once win a national spelling bee? Place second in a science fair? Were you a blue ribbon flower arranger at the county fair?  (that one is me) Do you play a mean harmonica?  Adding something unusually interesting or fun helps bring you to life as a person and that helps people remember you.

Remember, like a good novel, a good bio should be a compelling, rich story: of you.

Creating a dynamic professional bio is an exercise in developing self confidence.  And self confidence  is a skill that can be learned.  One of the first steps, is learning to be comfortable talking (and writing) about yourself in a powerful way.

Just as it’s time for my client to become comfortable writing and thinking of himself as an “expert,” it’s time for you to consider owning your achievements too.

Be accurate. But don’t shy from tooting your own horn. If you don’t, who will?

 Copyright 2015 Gina London. All Rights Reserved. 

How to be Determinedly Optimistic!

Lulu's first day back to school and yes, she needed a scarf! We're in Ireland!
Lulu’s first day back to school and yes, she needed a scarf! We’re in Ireland!

“How was your summer?” The friendly barista at my gym here in Ireland asked me.

“Good really, I certainly can’t complain,” I replied.

“No one would listen anyway,” he added chuckling.

I thought about that.  It’s true. We really don’t want to listen to people who complain.  Yet, why do so many of us continue to keep up the constant drum-beat of negativity.

You know the types.  Every business project is overwhelming. Every boss doesn’t understand them.  Their aches and pains. The traffic. The weather.

Ah, the weather.  That’s an especially good subject being the transplanted American living here in Ireland now.   Just over a week ago, I was wrapping up a wonderful month in the US – speaking and training at conferences and then spending time with family and friends in the hot and humid Midwest.   We wore sleeveless shirts and sandals.

Now, I’m back in Cork, Ireland where the clouds are almost always moving.  I wake up and there’s sun and by the time I make the bed, the wind and rain have swept in.  Then five more minutes and the sun breaks out again –complete with rainbow.  Last week, I saw three rainbows in one day. No kidding.

The Irish are what I like to describe as “determinedly optimistic” about weather.  They make up funny sayings about it like,

We have four seasons in one day.


 What are an Irish person’s two favorite days? Christmas and summer.

When our plane landed, my daughter, Lulu, and I quickly put on the sweaters we had brought with us for our walk across the brisk and breezy tarmac to the customs and baggage claim terminals.

Yesterday was her first day back to school.  She wore her school’s “summer uniform” which, naturally, comes complete with matching cardigan.  Lulu also reached for a white scarf with dragonflies on it. She wrapped three times around her neck.  She was ready to go and she was happy – no matter what the weather.

After I dropped her off, I zipped over to the shopping center for a few items before getting to work. I noticed other ladies at the shops were also wearing brightly colored scarves.  And sleeveless shirts. And sandals.

It was if they were proclaiming, “The calendar still says it’s summer, no matter what the weather may feel like.”

This week Time magazine is listing 13 ways to be a better human being.  It starts from within. From our attitude to our work, our family, even the weather.

What are we proclaiming every day?  Are we being determinedly optimistic or are we constantly complaining?

Who is listening to us?  What opinions are they forming?

It’s up to you, isn’t it? I say,

Grab a proverbial scarf and keep going!

Copyright 2015 Gina London. All Rights Reserved.